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LOSING TIME: Submarines Can't Submerge

Oct 30, 2017
Defense Drumbeat

“Every day we live under a continuing resolution is a day we do damage to our military.”  - Mac Thornberry, Chairman, House Armed Services Committee


Submarines Can't Submerge
 

THE PROBLEM:

Submarines must receive certification that they are capable of submerging.  The Navy tries to have the expiration of these certifications coincide with a submarine’s regularly scheduled maintenance period.  Repeated CRs and funding cuts have thrown this cycle off, causing subs to sit idle when their certifications to submerge expire.  Notably, the USS Boise has been idle for over two years (31 months) because the Navy does not have the dock space to conduct needed maintenance.   

 

WHAT WE ARE DOING TODAY:

The Navy has instituted a plan to minimize the time our subs sit idle, even with their best efforts, 9 subs are scheduled to be idle, unable to submerge or operate, for 3 months or more.  Extended CRs and additional budget cuts could put that plan in jeopardy, and 9 subs would be inoperative for ten months or more. 

 

WHAT WE COULD BE DOING:

The House-passed NDAA provides the reliable funding the Navy needs to ensure their mitigation plan can proceeded and submarines get back to sea faster.  The NDAA adds $1.3 billion to support submarine and ship maintenance. 

115th Congress

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